Dome homes

OK, here it is. For the last 3 years or so I haven’t been able to shut up about Monolithic Dome Homes, and people have been getting tired of hearing me go on about them over and over again, so here is my masterpost about WHY MONOLITHIC DOME HOMES ARE AWESOME.

(From what I can tell, anyway. I have not yet gotten the chance to live in one, but I AM GOING TO as soon as I can afford it, and I want enough people to know about them so the company will still be in business by that time.)

First. They are homes shaped like domes.

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But they don’t have to look boring…

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That one, in Pensacola, survived a hurricane:

 

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Because dome homes are INCREDIBLY durable.

This is one in Iraq, where a freaking BOMB dropped in through the roof, EXPLODED inside the dome, and the dome is STILL STANDING.

BAGHDAD, Iraq (AFPN) -- A member (bottom right) of the Combined Weapons Effectiveness Assessment Team assesses the impact point of a precision-guided 5,000-pound bomb through the dome of one of Saddam Hussein's key regime buildings here. The impact point is one of up to 500 the team will assess in coming weeks. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Michael Best)

BAGHDAD, Iraq (AFPN) — A member (bottom right) of the Combined Weapons Effectiveness Assessment Team assesses the impact point of a precision-guided 5,000-pound bomb through the dome of one of Saddam Hussein’s key regime buildings here. The impact point is one of up to 500 the team will assess in coming weeks. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Michael Best)

They are literally monolithic— all one piece, made of extra-strong concrete reinforced with steel.

They are made by spraying shotcrete over an inflated balloon, laying a grid of steel, then spraying some more.

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THERE ARE NO HOLES. No weak spots. Aside from windows, doors, and connections to sewers and electricity, and vents for air, there is not a single place they can leak.

No walls getting eaten by raccoons. No fire damage. No dripping ceilings. Practically no home maintenance. All one piece. And ridiculously energy-efficient too!

durable

centuries

 

CENTURIES.

And yes, they’re also available as adorable teeny cabins, small enough to transport on a truck.

 

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Unlike the full-size dome homes, the cabins are not officially rated as tornado-proof, but they will stand up to a lot more dangerous weather than any other tiny house.

And while a 1000-square-foot Dome Home runs about $130,000 to build fully finished, the cabins are under $35,000.

(They all SHOULD be cheaper, considering how easy they are to build, but, economies of scale, bla bla bla. Which is why I want more people to get interested in the dang things!)

There are an endless number of possible floorplans for the interior.

 

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And speaking of the interior:

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And guess what! They are some of the best structures to use for the base of hobbit houses in hillsides!

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Imagine it. Imagine having a house that never leaks, barely requires maintenance, gets 50% better energy-efficiency than anything else, and stands up to FREAKING TORNADOES and HURRICANES.

And looks like an AWESOME BUBBLE!

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I know it’ll be a long road. They look awesome and they’re environmentally friendly, and city governments LOVE to outlaw and tear down anything that fits those descriptions, so for the moment, it’s very hard to get away with building them inside a city.

But just think about how much money and effort and time and stress is wasted every year on freaking home maintenance, and freaking energy bills, and how much of that we could just freaking STOP with these bubbly miracle houses, if they just got popular enough to be accepted, and…

I’m going on and on again. Sorry.

Good night.

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